Cronkite School changes video, audio editing programs

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Beginning in the fall, the Walter Cronkite School will switch to using Adobe Premiere and Audition for video and audio editing programs replacing Final Cut Pro 7. (Maddie Pado/DD)

Beginning in the fall, the Walter Cronkite School will switch over to using Adobe Premiere and Audition for video and audio editing programs replacing Final Cut Pro 7. (Maddie Pado/DD)

Returning journalism students will have to get used to new video and audio editing software this fall as the Walter Cronkite School decided to make a platform change this summer.

The school will drop Final Cut Pro and Soundtrack Pro and adopt Adobe Creative Suite 6, Premiere Pro for video editing and Audition for audio editing, according to an email sent to students and faculty from Christopher Callahan, dean of the Walter Cronkite School and vice provost for the Downtown campus. Final Cut and Soundtrack will not be available to use on school computers.

“(It will be a) relatively seamless transition into this new editing system and I think once our students get their hands on it they’re going to be really excited and not afraid to make that transition,” said Mark Lodato, assistant dean at the Cronkite School.

The school first considered changing editing software when Apple no longer supported Final Cut 7, Lodato said. The school decided on the Adobe products after considering the work students do and where the industry was heading, he said.

Adobe representatives will begin training faculty on the new software next week, Lodato said.

“For the adjunct professors, especially the videography professors who have been teaching quite a few semesters and who have been in the business for a long, long time, learning a new software program is not a big deal,” said videography professor Gilbert Zermeno. “It’s just a rearranging of buttons but they all basically do the same thing.”

Extra time will be allotted in skill courses for students to learn the new system, Lodato said. Students will also be able to meet with Adobe-trained professors in an open house format.

“I have heard of a couple students grumbling about it on Facebook and I pointed this out to them that this is a great opportunity for them to learn a new piece of software that they can apply when they go out there to the real world,” Zermeno said.

Journalism senior Jake Stein said he is glad the school switched to Adobe because learning the new editing software will help him in the professional world.

“In order to be a successful journalist you really need to stay on top of the changes in the industry. And it seems like Adobe is playing an important role in media,” Stein said.

Both Lodato and Zermeno also said this will be an opportunity for professors and students to expand their skill set making them more valuable to potential employers.

“This business is always changing,” Zermeno said. “New technology is always coming along.”

Contact the reporter at danika.worthington@asu.edu