Jobot to open bar with distinct menu in backyard of property over the summer

Jobot Coffee and Dining, located on Fifth and Roosevelt streets, will begin serving mixed drinks. The coffee shop is located next to the Lost Leaf, a bar that serves wine and beer. (Amanda LaCasse/DD)
Jobot Coffee and Dining, located on Fifth and Roosevelt streets, will begin serving mixed drinks midsummer. The coffee shop is located next to the Lost Leaf, a bar that serves wine and beer. (Amanda LaCasse/DD)

Jobot Coffee and Dining on Fifth Street between Roosevelt and Garfield streets plans to open a bar this summer to expand its business.

The owner of Jobot and Melt Ice Cream, John Sagasta, obtained a series 12 liquor license — the least expensive — in October.

Related: Jobot applies for liquor license, receives mixed reactions from customers

A large shed located in the back of the property will be remodeled into the bar, which will offer locally crafted brews and spirits. The backyard will feature its own distinct menu, functioning as if the coffee shop and the bar were two separate businesses, Sagasta said.

“Adding the bar to the property won’t commingle guests,” Sagasta said. “I respect and am very conscious that a lot of people use Jobot as a place where drinking is absent.”

Jobot currently has a makeshift bar in its side yard that has only been used three times in the past four months. Sagasta said he looks forward to building a permanent bar for customers.

Excited to introduce a new element to the coffee shop, Sagasta is working with a contractor to create the bar.

“There is not a specific inspiration for the style or design of the bar,” he said. “Like everything around here, function is key.”

Besides being a revenue builder, he said he is excited for the job opportunities the bar and expansion of the kitchen will create for the downtown community, specifically Fifth Street.

“With so many people and businesses moving downtown, the bar will allow us to stay fresh and current,” Sagasta said.

A minimum 40 percent of gross revenue must come from food sales according to the Arizona Department of Liquor, so expanding food offerings will be important for the bar’s success — without that proportion, Jobot could lose its liquor license. Sagasta said he is sure this won’t occur, as Jobot has an already established clientele and he understands his target market.

ASU student Bri Wagner said Jobot’s steady innovation, involvement in the community and dynamic atmosphere keeps her a regular customer. She said she was sure the bar would be successful.

“John Sagasta has an amazingly creative approach to his businesses, clearly displayed in Jobot and Melt, so I’m pretty confident it will go off without a hitch and take Jobot to the next level,” she said.

Self-proclaimed coffee-shop connoisseur Jordan Rezzonico said the atmosphere of the bar will have an effect on whether customers will continue to come.

“I respect and applaud Jobot not only as a company but as members of the downtown community for the conscious effort being made to keep the coffee shop and bar separate entities,” she said.

Sagasta said fellow downtown business owners have shown nothing but support.

“The more stuff that can happen on this street, the better. It provides recognition for all,” he said.

Contact the reporter savanah.garbani@asu.edu.