Metronome: Folk-rock standout Dawes brings their new album to Crescent

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Dawes will be performing their new album “We’re All Gonna Die,” at Crescent Ballroom. Photo courtesy of Matt Jacoby.
Dawes will be performing their new album “We’re All Gonna Die,” at Crescent Ballroom.
Photo courtesy of Matt Jacoby.

Whether it’s an unfortunate fact or another great Dawes album, “We’re All Gonna Die,” is something everyone needs to hear. On Jan. 11, Dawes will bring their honestly titled September release to life at the Crescent Ballroom for the second stop on the “An Evening With Dawes” tour, featuring two full-length sets of new and old music.

Drummer Griffin Goldsmith said the band’s past performances of tracks off “We’re All Gonna Die” have proved how positively the new songs will translate over to new live audiences.

“It fits in really well with the rest of the set,” Goldsmith said. “We’ve had a couple shows where we are bringing six, seven songs from the new records and also playing things from the older records, which represents all the material, and it worked famously.”

It’s unsurprising that Dawes have already sold out several shows, less than a month after the band announced their 50-date tour. While Goldsmith said the success of “We’re All Gonna Die” is difficult to quantify, it’s hard to ignore the album’s rapid chart climbing, its leading vinyl sales and Dawes’ subsequent performances on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” and CBS.

Humbly, Goldsmith said his estimation of the LP’s success has mostly been based on one-on-one interactions with fans, who have all given positive reviews.

“Then again, I’m kind of living in a bubble here in L.A., so I don’t really know,” Goldsmith joked.

While the anticipation for the album could have 2015 album “All Your Favorite Bands” to thank, it’s the growth in Dawes’ songwriting style that put “We’re All Gonna Die” in the national scope. The album presents a more heavily alternative side to the band, with leading track “When the Tequila Runs Out” providing virtually no folk elements.

“The songs to me, it’s all just a natural progression,” Goldsmith said. “It’s definitely a larger difference in sound for us. I think that’s important, to continue to evolve and be creative.”

Following the tour, it’s likely that fans will have a relatively short wait before they see further progressions. Goldsmith said he imagines the band will immediately start looking toward their next record.

Considering Dawes’ current track record, the band’s future work guarantees more unforgettable experiences for fans and for the four-piece. Having been able to work with and become friends with heroes like Jackson Browne, Goldsmith said that making music as a part of Dawes is not only incredible, but also something that never gets old.

“I feel like I’m living in a dream all the time,” Goldsmith said. “As a band, it’s always awesome in the studio. Not only are we doing shows, but we’re doing it with our best friends. There’s a lot. I wouldn’t even know where to start.”

Contact the columnist at Emily.Liu@asu.edu.